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Convert the following IEEE single-precision floating point numbers from hex to decimal:




a. 42F48000



b. CAB00000



c. 00700000



d. 3ABC0000

Ask the name and roll number of user and then take two float values from user and perform all arithmetic opertaions on them and print the answers.


  • Write the assembly language code fragment that corresponds with the following high level language code fragment. You will need to use the SUB (subtract) instruction.

If (A>B) OR (B<C) then

           A = A + C

Else

           B = C - A


  • Write the assembly fragment to perform the following:

For x = 1 to 10

A = A + x

Next x


  • Write the assembly code for the following high-level pseudo code:

if ((a>=b) AND (b==c)) OR (a<=c) then

a = b + c

else

            a = b - c




Write a procedure that reads a text-paragraph from a file and then prints the number of characters on the screen.

Suppose that you have a computer with a memory unit of 24 bits per word. In this 

computer, the assembly program’s instruction set consists of 198 different operations. 

All instructions have an operation code part (opcode) and an address part (allowing for 

only one address). Each instruction is stored in one word of memory.

a. How many bits are needed for the opcode?

b. How many bits are left for the address part of the instruction?

c. How many additional instructions could be added to this instruction set without 

exceeding the assigned number of bits? Discuss and show your calculations.

d. What is the largest unsigned binary number that the address can hold?


Let assume we have a list of numbers contains even and odd numbers , so you need to build an algorithm to make the odd number in the beginning of the list and the even number at the end of the list. For example:

List=[5,6,8,3,1,7,10] so after you build the algorithm the result will be as below: List=[5,3,1,7,6,8,10]


To answer question 1, you need to do the following:

1.    Write an algorithm to do the above task.

2.    Implement the algorithm using OUBuild script following the algorithm.

3.    Provide 2 screenshots showing output using two different Lists.

4.    What is the most efficient algorithm to sort the List in question 1.


Let assume we have a list of numbers contains even and odd numbers , so you need to build an algorithm to make the odd number in the beginning of the list and the even number at the end of the list. For example:

List=[5,6,8,3,1,7,10] so after you build the algorithm the result will be as below: List=[5,3,1,7,6,8,10]


To answer question 1, you need to do the following:

1.    Write an algorithm to do the above task.

2.    Implement the algorithm using OUBuild script following the algorithm.

3.    Provide 2 screenshots showing output using two different Lists.

4.    What is the most efficient algorithm to sort the List in question 1.


Suppose that you have a computer with a memory unit of 24 bits per word. In this computer, the assembly program’s instruction set consists of 198 different operations.

All instructions have an operation code part (opcode) and an address part (allowing for only one address).

Each instruction is stored in one word of memory.

a. How many bits are needed for the opcode?

b. How many bits are left for the address part of the instruction?

c. How many additional instructions could be added to this instruction set without exceeding the assigned number of bits? Discuss and show your calculations.

d. What is the largest unsigned binary number that the address can hold?


b) Add a screenshot of the simulation, showing the result (A screenshot of the MARIE Simulator window after running the program).

Instructions:

- Use “ORG” instruction to start your program at address equivalent to 25610.

- Use your last university ID number to input the value of X. For example, if your ID is1915161678234, then you will use the number 4 as the value of x.

- Do not forget to change the representation of the Input and Output windows in the simulator to Decimal. 


a) Write an assembly program using MARIE's assembly Instruction set that prompts the user to enter a non-negative integer that is less than 10. The program should include a subroutine that keeps prompting until a valid value is obtained. When a valid number is entered, it will be displayed. (Hint: Use JNS & JUMPI instructions to implement the subroutine)

N.B: You should include the MARIE code in your Answer, with an explanation of each instruction in your code beside it (not a screenshot!). Example: Subt One /Subtract 1 from AC


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