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Answer to Question #28569 in Other Physics for Richard E A Watkins

Question #28569
High I was wondering is there a way to intensify the electrons in the air around us
Expert's answer
An electron avalanche is a way to intensify the electrons in the air. An electron avalanche is a process in which a number of free electrons in a medium (usually a gas) are subjected to strong acceleration by an electric field, and subsequently collide with other atoms of the medium and thereby ionize them in a process called impact ionization. This releases additional electrons which are themselves accelerated and collide with further atoms, releasing more electrons, in a chain reaction. The result is the affected region of gas becomes a plasma, making it electrically conductive. Electron avalanches are essential to the dielectric breakdown process within gases. The process can culminate in corona discharges, streamers, leaders, or in a spark or continuous arc that completely bridges the gap between the electrical conductors that are applying the voltage. The process extends to huge sparks — streamers in lightning discharges propagate by formation of electron avalanches created in the high potential gradient ahead of the streamers' advancing tips. Once begun, avalanches are often intensified by the creation of photoelectrons as a result of ultraviolet radiation emitted by the excited medium's atoms in the aft-tip region. High-velocity electrons often collide with neutral atoms inelastically, sometimes ionizing them. In a chain-reaction — or an 'electron avalanche' — additional electrons recently separated from their positive ions by the strong potential gradient, cause a large cloud of electrons and positive ions to be momentarily generated by just a single initial electron. However, free electrons are easily captured by neutral oxygen or water vapor molecules (so-called electronegative gases), forming negative ions. In air at STP, free electrons exist for only about 11 nanoseconds before being captured. Captured electrons are effectively removed from play — they can no longer contribute to the avalanche process. If electrons are being created at a rate greater than they are being lost to capture, their number rapidly multiplies, a process characterized by exponential growth.

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