Answer to Question #174105 in General Chemistry for shah

Question #174105

Solubility- hexachlorobenzene

Q1)Using the Lewis structures of the molecule and water, identify and label areas of intermolecular attraction.

▪More than one water molecule should be shown

▪Label the type of IM forces present

b)Using the Lewis structures of the molecule and a nonpolar solvent (e.g., hexane), identify and label areas of intermolecular attraction.

c)explain the solubility (or lack thereof) of your molecule in water. When available, use solubility data (at the same temperature) to support your explanation.

d)explain the solubility (or lack thereof) of your molecule in nonpolar solvents. When available, use solubility data (at the same temperature) to support your explanation.

e)when dissolved in water, qualitatively discuss whether the molecule is a strong electrolyte, weak electrolyte, or nonelectrolyte.


1
Expert's answer
2021-03-24T02:47:49-0400

1A) To determine the intermolecular forces of a molecule or chemical, you must first construct the electron dot structure (Lewis structure). Then you determine the polarity of the molecule. Once you have those done determining the types of intermolecular bonds become much more simple.



B) The two interactions between by water molecules that help them to travel upward in the plants are adhesion and cohesion.Adhesion is the attraction between the water molecules and the xylem vessels which help them keep a good contact with xylem vessels whereas, Cohesion is the attraction between two water molecules that keeps the flow continuous and prevents breaks.Other physical processes that help are : Transpiration pull, Root pressure, Capillary action.


C) The solubility of a given solute in a given solvent typically depends on temperature. Many salts show a large increase in solubility with temperature. Some solutes exhibit solubility that is fairly independent of temperature. A few, such as cerium(III) sulfate, become less soluble in water as temperature increases.

D) When a nonpolar solute meets a nonpolar solvent, the attraction between the solvent and solute molecules is also greater than the solute-solute or solvent-solvent forces; ergo, a nonpolar solute can generally dissolve in a nonpolar solvent (driven by entropy, of course)


E) Acetic acid is an example of a weak electrolyte even though it is highly soluble in water. Weak electrolytes only partially ionize in water (usually 1% to 10%), while strong electrolytes completely ionize (100%).




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